Tamagotchis are finally coming to your phone, where you can slowly kill them at your own convenience

“After decades of being confined to little plastic eggs (and the occasional, usually Japan-only video game), nostalgia-rich pet simulators Tamagotchi are finally coming to people’s phones, where we can all fuck up raising them at our own convenience.”

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Driverless Hotel Rooms: The End of Uber, Airbnb and Human Landlords

Written by: Nathan Waters – Building @peerismorg a better economy for everyone, solving job automation via skill tokens on ethereum blockchain. Founded @sydethereum @hackagong @futawe

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One of many IDEO Automobility Moving Spaces concepts

“Good evening ladies and gentlemen, we’re about to begin our descent into Sydney. Please fasten your seatbelts and place your trays in the upright position. Local time is 8:42pm and a humid 27 degrees. Our flight crew wishes you a Happy New Year, and we hope you fly with us again in 2025.”

Driverless vehicles are simply rooms sitting atop an all-electric drivetrain and rechargeable battery pack with a few extra visual, laser or radar sensors.

This opens endless possibilities to re-imagine vehicles as moving rooms able to cater to a vast array of human experiences and activities:

  • the driverless office
  • the driverless boardroom
  • the driverless gym
  • the driverless bedroom
  • the driverless bathroom
  • the driverless cafe
  • the driverless cinema
  • the driverless shop

These rooms need not be used in isolation either. They can be dynamic, modular and interconnected with other driverless rooms via an ondemand request. Tap a button or speak a request, and moments later you can have a bathroom or gym module drive itself to your location and autonomously connect to the office module you’re currently working from.

 

This Is The Biggest Key to Happiness, According to Science

 

 

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Photo by Alvan Nee on Unsplash

You don’t need to be happy all the time.

The founding father of positive psychology, Martin Seligman, describes happiness as experiencing frequent positive emotions, such as joy, excitement and contentment, combined with deeper feelings of meaning and purpose.

It implies a positive mindset in the present and an optimistic outlook for the future.

Importantly, happiness experts have argued that happiness is not a stable, unchangeable trait but something flexible that we can work on and ultimately strive towards.

So leading a happy life is not about avoiding hard times; it is about being able to respond to adversity in a way that allows you to grow from the experience.

Unlike feeling happy, which is a transient state, leading a happier life is about individual growth through finding meaning.

It is about accepting our humanity with all its ups and downs, enjoying the positive emotions, and harnessing painful feelings in order to reach our full potential.

Lowri Dowthwaite, Lecturer in Psychological Interventions, University of Central Lancashire

This article was originally published by The Conversation.

Read the original article here